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twitter.com/AADRHoldings:

    annwoodhandmade:

flamingos  in love
handmade crepe paper flamingos

    annwoodhandmade:

    flamingos  in love

    handmade crepe paper flamingos

    (via morganlevine)

    — 6 months ago with 21 notes
    gjmueller:

Your memory is no video camera: It edits the past with present experiences

Your memory is a wily time traveler, plucking fragments of the present and inserting them into the past, reports a new study. In terms of accuracy, it’s no video camera. Rather, memory rewrites the past with current information, updating your recollections with new experiences to aid survival. Love at first sight, for example, is more likely a trick of your memory than a Hollywood-worthy moment.

    gjmueller:

    Your memory is no video camera: It edits the past with present experiences

    Your memory is a wily time traveler, plucking fragments of the present and inserting them into the past, reports a new study. In terms of accuracy, it’s no video camera. Rather, memory rewrites the past with current information, updating your recollections with new experiences to aid survival. Love at first sight, for example, is more likely a trick of your memory than a Hollywood-worthy moment.

    (Source: sciencedaily.com)

    — 6 months ago with 15 notes
    thetrevorproject:

And if it’s not, reach out for help.

    thetrevorproject:

    And if it’s not, reach out for help.

    (Source: the-healing-nest)

    — 6 months ago with 7274 notes
    nprglobalhealth:

How a human lung is kept alive and breathing for a transplant
Lung in a box. Very cool.
To extend the time an organ can last before it’s transplanted into a recipient, engineers have developed the Organ Care System — which is essentially a box pumping blood and oxygen to the lung.   
As Gizmodo explains: 

What’s especially neat about the OCS is that they can actually be used to improve imperfect donor lungs by flushing it with antibiotics and nutrients. Like refurbishing a lung, sort of. Putting donor lungs through the OCS helps increase and improve the number of potential donor lungs. Not every donor lung is usable, donor lungs that go through the OCS may be.

Learn more about lung transplants at Al Jazeera America. 
(ht ASAP Science)

    nprglobalhealth:

    How a human lung is kept alive and breathing for a transplant

    Lung in a box. Very cool.

    To extend the time an organ can last before it’s transplanted into a recipient, engineers have developed the Organ Care System — which is essentially a box pumping blood and oxygen to the lung.   

    As Gizmodo explains: 

    What’s especially neat about the OCS is that they can actually be used to improve imperfect donor lungs by flushing it with antibiotics and nutrients. Like refurbishing a lung, sort of. Putting donor lungs through the OCS helps increase and improve the number of potential donor lungs. Not every donor lung is usable, donor lungs that go through the OCS may be.

    Learn more about lung transplants at Al Jazeera America

    (ht ASAP Science)

    (via science-junkie)

    — 6 months ago with 13091 notes

    science-junkie:

    A planet whose seasons are impossible to predict

    Thank to Earth’s stable axial tilt, our seasons are highly predictable. But there’s a planet out there called Kepler-413b that’s wobbling so wildly, its seasons are in a constant state of flux.

    The planet, discovered by Kepler, spins around a close pair of orange and red dwarf stars every 66 days. It precesses, or wobbles, wildly on its spin axis, much like a child’s top. Remarkably, the tilt of its spin axis varies by as much as 30 degrees over the course of 11 years, which is an extremely short amount of time as far as these things go. Normally, a precession effect like this isn’t measured on human timescales.

    Because it’s wobbling so badly, the planet experiences rapid seasonal changes that are highly erratic. It’s like a Game of Thrones world come to life — except that it’s a Neptune-like planet about 65 times the mass of Earth. Even with its changing seasons, the planet is too warm to harbor life. And because it orbits so close to its parent stars, its temperatures are too high for liquid water to exist.

    Read more

    — 6 months ago with 472 notes

    oupacademic:

    Social Explorer at ALA Midwinter 2014! Andrew Beveridge, President and CEO of Social Explorer and Professor of Sociology at Queens College and the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York, speaks to some assembled librarians about how to access and illustrate current and historical census data and demographic information.

    — 6 months ago with 28 notes
    scissorsandthread:

Love Story Printable | Elli Blog
This is a really simple but sweet gift to give for Valentine’s Day. Wrap in some coordinating kraft paper and white ribbon and give it to someone you love!

    scissorsandthread:

    Love Story Printable | Elli Blog

    This is a really simple but sweet gift to give for Valentine’s Day. Wrap in some coordinating kraft paper and white ribbon and give it to someone you love!

    — 6 months ago with 280 notes
    A proton and an electron walk into a bar... →

    oupacademic:

    Science is a very serious business, so what tickles a rational mind? In a not very scientific experiment, The Guardian asked a sample of scientists for their favorite jokes, including OUP authors Uta Frith, Russell G. Foster, and Mark Pagel.

    — 6 months ago with 69 notes
    creativeanchorage:

Lovely vintage threads, from the attic.  Look at the orange one towards the middle, it’s so tiny!

    creativeanchorage:

    Lovely vintage threads, from the attic.  Look at the orange one towards the middle, it’s so tiny!

    (via craftdiscoveries)

    — 6 months ago with 295 notes
    smarterplanet:

ibmblr:
TED-Ed teams up with IBM Researcher Eric Brown to illustrate a lesson on The New Era of Cognitive Computing →

    smarterplanet:

    ibmblr:

    TED-Ed teams up with IBM Researcher Eric Brown to illustrate a lesson on The New Era of Cognitive Computing →
    — 6 months ago with 74 notes
    oupacademic:

It’s the anniverary of Charels Dickens’ birth today! We want to know, which Dickens character are you? Take the Oxford Words quiz, reblog, and let us know!

    oupacademic:

    It’s the anniverary of Charels Dickens’ birth today! We want to know, which Dickens character are you? Take the Oxford Words quiz, reblog, and let us know!

    — 6 months ago with 264 notes
    smarterplanet:

Worlds Smallest LED is a Single Molecule
By coaxing light out of a single polymer molecule, researchers have made the world’s tiniest light-emitting diode.
This work is part of an interdisciplinary effort to make molecular scale electronic devices, which hold the potential for creating smaller but more powerful and energy-efficient computers. Guillaume Schull and his colleagues at the University of Strasbourg in France made the device with the conducting polymer polythiophene. They used a scanning tunneling microscope tip to locate and grab a single polythiophene molecule lying on a gold substrate. Then they pulled up the tip to suspend the molecule like a wire between the tip and the substrate.
The researchers report in the journalPhysical Review Letters that when they applied a voltage across the molecule, they were able to measure a nanoampere-scale current passing through it and to record light emitted from it.
(via First Single-Molecule LED - IEEE Spectrum)

    smarterplanet:

    Worlds Smallest LED is a Single Molecule

    By coaxing light out of a single polymer molecule, researchers have made the world’s tiniest light-emitting diode.

    This work is part of an interdisciplinary effort to make molecular scale electronic devices, which hold the potential for creating smaller but more powerful and energy-efficient computers. Guillaume Schull and his colleagues at the University of Strasbourg in France made the device with the conducting polymer polythiophene. They used a scanning tunneling microscope tip to locate and grab a single polythiophene molecule lying on a gold substrate. Then they pulled up the tip to suspend the molecule like a wire between the tip and the substrate.

    The researchers report in the journalPhysical Review Letters that when they applied a voltage across the molecule, they were able to measure a nanoampere-scale current passing through it and to record light emitted from it.

    (via First Single-Molecule LED - IEEE Spectrum)

    — 6 months ago with 526 notes

    science-junkie:

    Which sport and country give you the best shot at entering that Olympic Stadium? Find out YOUR odds, and which sports are objectively hardest/easiest.

    — 6 months ago with 86 notes